Prisoners of Azkabam now on Main Street

From+top%3A+Tague+Zachary%2C+Dabney+Hofammann%2C+Charis+Russell%2C+Zev+Braun+%28all+%E2%80%9915%29+and+Ruby+Barnard-Mayers+%E2%80%9916+in+their+home+on+Main+Street.+Photo+by+Jun+Taek+Lee+

From top: Tague Zachary, Dabney Hofammann, Charis Russell, Zev Braun (all ’15) and Ruby Barnard-Mayers ’16 in their home on Main Street. Photo by Jun Taek Lee

From top: Tague Zachary, Dabney Hofammann, Charis Russell, Zev Braun (all ’15) and Ruby Barnard-Mayers ’16 in their home on Main Street. Photo by Jun Taek Lee
From top: Tague Zachary, Dabney Hofammann, Charis Russell, Zev Braun (all ’15) and Ruby Barnard-Mayers ’16 in their home on Main Street. Photo by Jun Taek Lee

From the outside, 1208 Main Street looks like a dark and bleak place, but inside, the house comes alive with its colorful décor and equally lively residents.  Zev Braun, Dabney Hofammann, Charis Russell, Tague Zachary (all ’15) and Ruby Barnard-Mayers ’16 refer to themselves as the prisoners of Azkabam, a play on one of their many house names.

“We are the prisoners of Azkabam, or *ss cabin or *ss cabaña, because we got that booty though,” Zachary said.

The group decided to live together for a variety of reasons. Russell originally proposed the idea to Hofammann and Zachary, and the rest of the group followed.

“Charis sat me down one day and said, ‘Tague. I want to live with you,’ and I was like, ‘That sounds like hot sh*t.’ I think Charis had spoken with Dabney about living together,” Zachary said.  “I knew I wanted to live with Zev because I wanted to have a terrible housemate. Everything has been going according to plan.”

Zachary, Hofammann, Russell and Braun have lived together since the beginning of the school year, and Barnard-Mayers joined the group this semester when her study abroad plans fell through. Busy schedules have kept the group apart, but Barnard-Mayers’ friendly calls have brought them a little closer together.

“Our tradition is never being at the house at the same time,” said Hofammann.

“Although we do hear each other,” Zachary added. “Not really talking, just screeching and cackles.”

“Ruby has brought us together this semester. She’s one of the only people who walks out in between the rooms and talks to people,” Zachary said.

“I like to yell through the doors if I hear movement or muttering,” Barnard-Mayers said.

However, Barnard-Mayers said she can never be sure if the noises she hears are coming from her housemates, or from their house ghost, Eddie, who frequently bangs on doors and windows.

While some might have been spooked by the ghostly addition to the group, the prisoners of Azkabam haven’t let it get them down. The housemates have managed to keep their spirits high by appreciating their colorful décor.

“Every room is a different color,” Barnard-Mayers said.

“We painted the kitchen and the living room when we got here,” Russell added.

Colorful walls are not the house’s only perk. The group also appreciates their close proximity to Kum & Go and their unique basement. 

“The basement is really weird,” Hofammann said.

“My favorite part [of the basement] is that there is a vault that has been ripped open at the locking mechanism, so you just swing it open and there is a half-shriveled balloon inside on the floor with a face painted on it,” Braun said.

Azkabam also boasts an oversized second floor bathroom.

“Our second floor bathroom is ridiculous. Everything is pushed onto one wall. You could fit like a queen sized mattress inside,” Braun said.

Although some of the group members appreciate the large bathroom, Hofammann felt that the excess space could have been put to better use.

“My room could have been huge,” she said.

Hofammann is not the only resident of Azkabam who feels cramped. Barnard-Mayers has taken up residence in the second floor utility closet because of their limited space.

“I’m fine living in the utility closet. I’ve accepted it and moved on,” she said.

Even though Azkabam has its pitfalls, the group has enjoyed living together and having the opportunity to get off campus.

“It’s kind of far, but I like having a walk home,” Barnard-Mayers said. “If I’ve had a really stressful day, I like getting away from campus.”